Watch: Emergency surgery for Thrombosed Prolapsed Piles

External hemorrhoids (piles) occur distal to the dentate line and develop as a result of distention and swelling of the external hemorrhoidal venous system (see the first image below).

Engorgement of a hemorrhoidal vessel with acute swelling may allow blood to pool and, subsequently, clot; this leads to the acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid, a bluish-purplish discoloration often accompanied by severe incapacitating pain (see the second image below).


Thrombosed external hemorrhoids are a common problem but remain a poorly studied topic. Reported risk factors for thrombosed external hemorrhoid include a recent bout of constipation [2, 3] and traumatic vaginal delivery.

Although conservative nonsurgical treatment (stool softeners, increased dietary fiber, increased fluid intake, warm baths, analgesia) ultimately results in improvement of symptoms for most patients, surgical excision of the thrombosed external hemorrhoid often precipitates resolution.

Newer conservative treatments, such as topical nifedipine, show promise of having advantages over traditional conservative treatments, such as lidocaine ointment; however, in comparison with surgical excision, they have not yet been shown to shorten the time to symptom resolution or reduce the frequency of recurrence.

Surgical excision of the acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid is within the purview of an office-based or emergency practitioner. [10, 11] This safe procedure offers low recurrence and complication rates and high levels of patient acceptance and satisfaction.

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